Monthly Archives: March 2015

Long is the Way, and Hard…

Despite not having a Beatrice to guide me on my way, I have made it through the seven circles of hell.  Not Dante’s, de la Maza’s.  (Click here for details.)  On March 5th I completed my first run through de la Maza’s Seven Circles of Hell program.  I noted the variations I would make in the program in the previous blog post on this topic (found by clicking here).  The big question is, did it work?  I have to let the numbers do the talking.  While I don’t have chess.com (blitz rating) data points that I can use to find what kind of linear regression is at work, the charts the site offers can make for a good estimate of what happened.  Here are the charts of the progress.

 Circles 1

 

Circles 2

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Filed under Chess, Education, Personal

22nd Annual (2015) Kent State Philosophy Graduate Student Conference In Remembrance of May 4th (Part II)

The paper I presented at Kent State University’s Graduate Philosophy Conference can be found by clicking here.  The paper is a reworking of a paper I wrote during Jordi Cat’s philosophy of time seminar in the fall of 2013.  By “reworking,” I mean that the paper was truncated from its current monographic length of 68 pages, and then reorganized, many of the citations and resources extracted, and, finally, given an ad hoc introduction and conclusion.  I chose to eliminate many of the references to the literature because, like so many of the works a philosopher of science that are too technical and specialized for the general philosophical audience, I felt it would be too much for the randomly chosen philosopher —especially a graduate student— to get without extensive reading (or without more space to discuss the ideas).  Therefore, McTaggart, Sider, Craig Bourne, Earman, and other authors were not referenced in the presented version of the work.  Continue reading

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Filed under History and Philosophy of Science, Metaphysics, Metaphysics, Philosophy

22nd Annual (2015) Kent State Philosophy Graduate Student Conference In Remembrance of May 4th (Part I)

Among all of the conferences that I have attended or presented at, Kent State’s Graduate Philosophy Conference was the most professionally done of the bunch.  I think the reputation of this conference is growing, based on the quality of the papers presented (and from the number I heard that were submitted) and representatives present from top school; this year there were two Harvard students and one Oxford student presenting, along with some of the most creative philosophers-in-training from the American West to East Coast, California to New York, as it were.  For anyone looking a good and productive venue to make intellectual progress, I strongly suggest submitting to this conference in the future.  Continue reading

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Filed under Education, Personal, Philosophy